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Benefits of Natural Self-Care

Why Natural Selfcare?

In considering our goal of achieving ultimate peak at every pillar of our wellness, we first must cleanse ourselves and our environment of all that is toxic. It is said that on average, we use over 40 products known to be toxic around on daily basis.

According to EWG, these toxins are in our personal care products, household cleaning items, supplements, and food, and drinking water. Some have serious consequences such as being known carcinogens.

At BlueFlower, we carefully access to ensure that our products are:

          

Our products are premium, our educational material is credible, our essential oil ingredients are pure & unadulterated. Start using BlueFlower products as your first step of a better health, better environment, and better you!

A Brief History of Aromatherapy


Ancient Cultures and Essential Oils

Many ancient cultures recognized the physical and psychological benefits of scented ointments and oils. Egyptians use of aromatic botanicals started with the mummification process of the bodies of the deceased, embalmers used different botanicals such as cinnamon, frankincense, myrrh, and juniper.

egypt-aromatherapy

Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egyptians knowledge of essential oils healing power inspired Romans to use them after their invasion of Egypt, hence, using aromatic botanicals such as fir, juniper, and pine in bath houses. Israelites used essential oils such as frankincense, cedar wood, hyssop, fir, and spikenard to heal wounds and elevate spiritual communion. A prominent example of the value that essential oils had in Israelite culture is in the telling of the birth of Jesus, to whom gifts were given of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

Hippocrates, known as the father of modern medicine, maintained 2,500 years ago that “the key to good health rests on having a daily aromatic bath and scented massage’. Some of the plant materials Dioscorides wrote about in his Materia Medica 100 AD include many of the herbs and essential oils we use today including cardamom, cinnamon, myrrh, basil, fennel, frankincense, juniper, pine, rose, rosemary, and thyme. Scented ointments and oils were recognized as having great benefit on both the physical and psychological level. Bay laurel was used to produce a trance-like state; rose, myrtle and coriander were respected for their aphrodisiac properties, while myrrh and marjoram were used as sedatives.

Aromatic oils were used in China and India during the same period as ancient Egypt. One of the principle aspects of ayurvedic medicine is massage with aromatic oils.  Jasmine was used as a general tonic for the entire body. Rose was employed as an antidepressant and used to strengthen the liver. Chamomile was given for headaches, dizziness and colds. Many of the properties ascribed to herbs and aromatic oils by the ancients are regarded as valid today.

Distillation

avicenna

Avicenna

Distillation of essential oils is credited to the Persians. Avicenna (980 AD–1037 AD) invented the refrigerated coil in the distillation process of plants and made it possible to distill essential oils and floral waters (hydrosols).

A German physician, Hieronymus Braunschweig, wrote several books on essential oil distillation which went through hundreds of editions in every European language. In 1597 he referenced 25 essential oils including rosemary, lavender, clove, cinnamon, myrrh, and nutmeg. Many books about distillation of essential oils were written in the 16th century, especially in Germany, which seemed to be the center of European aromatherapy renaissance.

Antibacterial Properties of Essential Oils

The role of microorganisms in disease was recognized in the 1880’s and by 1887 French physicians recorded laboratory tests on the antibacterial properties of essential oils. These early tests resulted from the observation that there was a low incidence of tuberculosis in the flower growing districts in southern France. In 1888 a similar paper was published showing the micro-organisms of glandular and yellow fever were easily killed by active properties of oregano, Chinese cinnamon, angelica and geranium.

By the nineteenth century the role of the medical doctor was well established and in spite of regular use of essential oils, the medical professional became firmly fixed on isolating the active principles of natural substances and producing chemical drugs based on the identified “active ingredient” of the natural substance.

Antiseptic Properties of Essential Oils

In 1910, Rene Gattefosse discovered the healing properties of lavender after severely burning his hands in a laboratory explosion. He later used the wound healing and antiseptic properties of essential oils in the care of soldiers in military hospitals during WWI. Gattefosse coined the term “aromatherapy” with the 1937 publication of his book, of the same name. Gattefosse’s book has since been translated into English as Gattefosse’s Aromatherapy (1993). Dr. Jean Valnet, a French army surgeon used essential oils in the treatment of war wounds during the French Indochina War and wrote the book, Practice of Aromatherapy, which was translated into the English in 1964.

In the last 200 years, there has been a break in using aromatic botanicals in our daily lives. Mediations have become our first stop rather than last resort.   Usage of antibiotics, painkillers, and other medications have skyrocketed and we don’t seem to be healthier. Academic and regulatory organizations have started advocating integrative medicine where we can use the plethora of knowledge passed to us by our ancestors as well as the luxury of modern medicine.



Essential Oils and Scientific Research

Below are some examples of multiple organizations and media starting to recognize the positive impact of aromatherapy:

http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/explore-healing-practices/aromatherapy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4090492/

http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/aromatherapy-pdq

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/01/the-new-antibiotics-might-be-essential-oils/384247/

Preliminary research studies on essential oils show positive effects for a variety of health concerns including digestive issues, infections, pain, congestion, anxiety, depression, tumors, premenstrual syndrome, and many more. In order for scientific and regulatory bodies to prescribe essential oils for more serious issues, there will need to be more research. Until then, we can still enjoy natural remedies for minor ailments first.

http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/explore-healing-practices/aromatherapy/what-does-research-say-about-essential-oils

 * These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The contents of this website is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Please consult your medical professional before starting any new regimen or change your prescribed medication

Botanical and Essential Oil Based Products


Botanical based products & essential oils are gaining momentum for good reasons, they are natural, potent, effective, and safe.

Botanicals are powerful plant extracts and oils derived from flowers, herbs, nuts, seeds, roots and berries. And when harnessed in the right way, they can do wonders for our health.

Cleopatra used black cumin seed oil as a beauty treatment, and calendula has been used as a skin-healing poultice for hundreds of years. In general, seeds tend to be botanical powerhouses because everything a plant needs to grow is in that seed, resulting in concentrated nutrition for the skin. ‘Concentrated inside each seed is the power to fuel new life,’ says Hirsch. ‘It provides fundamental nutrients, from antioxidants to vitamins.’

Popular product ingredients like rosehip and grapeseed oil have been proven effective over time as many have been used in cleansing and moisturizing routines for generations and in clinical research trials. For example, black cumin seed oil has been studied over 200 times, confirming that it holds a host of antioxidants to regenerate and repair aging skin.

An essential oil is a natural product extracted from a single plant species. Not all plants produce essential oils, and in the plants that do, the essential oil may be found in the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, or fruits.

Hippocrates, known as the father of modern medicine, maintained 2,500 years ago that “the key to good health rests on having a daily aromatic bath and scented massage’. Some of the plant materials Dioscorides wrote about in his Materia Medica 100 AD include many of the herbs and essential oils we use today including cardamom, cinnamon, myrrh, basil, fennel, frankincense, juniper, pine, rose, rosemary, and thyme. Scented ointments and oils were recognized as having great benefit on both the physical and psychological level. Bay laurel was used to produce a trance-like state; rose, myrtle and coriander were respected for their aphrodisiac properties, while myrrh and marjoram were used as sedatives.

BlueFlower® products use natural and pure botanical based products and/or essential oils as our main ingredients in order to ensure that our products are best in class. Remember, skin is the largest organ on your body, take good care of it!

Our Ingredients


DESCRIPTIONBotanical NameINCI NameOrganicCOO
Bergamot Essential OilCitrus aurantium bergamiaCitrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Peel OilYesItaly
Chamomile (Roman) Essential OilAnthemis nobilisAnthemis Nobilis Flower OilNoFrance
Citronella Essential OilCymbopogon winterianusCymbopogon Cinterianus (Citronella) OilNoIndonesia
Eucalyptus Globulus Essential OilEucalyptus globulus LabillardiereEucalyptus Globulus Leaf OilNoChina
Frankincense Essential OilBoswellia sacra Flueck syn. Boswelia carteri Birdw.Boswellia carteri (Frankincense) OilNoFrance
Ginger Essential OilZingiber officinaleZingiber Officinale (Ginger) Root OilYesSri Lanka
Jasmine Absolute OilJasminum grandiflorum LJasminum Grandiflorum (Jasmine) Flower ExtractNoEgypt
Lavender Essential OilLavandula angustifolia Mill.Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) OilYesBulgaria
Lemon Essential OilCitrus limon (L.) Burm. FCitrus Limon (Lemon) Peel OilYesUSA
Marjoram Essential OilThymus mastichina L. (lamaiaceae)Origanum Majorana (Sweet Marjoram) OilYesSpain
Melaleuca (Tea Tree) Essential OilMelaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) CheelMelaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree) OilNoAustrailia
Orange Essential OilCitrus sinensis L. OsbeckCitrus Sinensis (Orange) Peel OilYesUSA
Oregano Essential OilOriganum vulgare L.Origanum Vulgare (Oregano) OilYesSpain
Patchouli Essential OilPogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth.Pogostemon Cablin (Patchouli) OilNoIndonesia
Peppermint Essential OilMentha piperita L.Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) OilYesUSA
Rose Absolute OilRosa damascena MillerRosa Damascena Flower OilNoFrance
Rosemary Essential OilRosemarinus officinalis LRosmainus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf OilYesSpain
Sandalwood Essential OilSantalum album L.Santalum Album (Sandalwood) OilNoNew Caledonia
Turmeric Essential OilCurcuma longaCurcuma Longa (Turmeric) Root ExtractYesGermany
Vanilla C02 Extract OilVanilla planifolia Flower ExtractVanilla Planifolia Fruit ExtractYesMadagascar
Vetiver Essential OilVetiveria zizaniodes (L.) NashVetiveria Zizanoides Root OilÊNoIndonesia
Ylang Ylang Extra Essential OilCananga odorata (Lam.) Hook. f.Cananga Odorata Flower OilNoMadagascar

A blue flower is a symbol of inspiration, hope, and beauty. 
It stands for desire, love, and the metaphysical striving for the infinite and unreachable.

BlueFlower. A natural self-care company.

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